amreading

Showing 125 posts tagged amreading

A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter

For more feverish love stories with unusual narration, try these… 

The Lover by Marguerite Duras for a lyrical and intensely erotic coming of age story that tangles identity and desire.

Bad Behavior by Mary Gaitskill for gritty stories about city life and the various, often less than entirely savory shapes that intimacy takes.

The Folding Star by Alan Hollinghurst for a blisteringly vivid portrait of a tutor’s obsession with his young charge.

Frances and Bernard by Carlene Bauer for a romance born and sustained through exceedingly lovely letters between two writers.

This post was guest edited by Caroline Eisenmann. Caroline works at a literary agency in New York. You can find her on Twitter here.

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Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

For more inventive and exciting adventure stories, try these…

Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne for another epic journey.

Northern Lights by Philip Pullman for an alternate world of adventure and wonder.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl for the excitement of exploring a new world.

Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell for a city explored from a different perspective.

The post was guest edited by author Kenneth Oppel. His latest novel, The Boundless, is out now. Follow him on Twitter here.

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

For more creepy stories and creative storytelling…

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson for a perfectly formed and utterly chilling story of family secrets. 

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness for the story a boy who is visited by a monster every night told in words and haunting illustrations.

In the Shadow of the Blackbirds by Cat Winters for another book that uses unsettling photos to tell a historical ghost story. 

The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly for a very dark fairy tale.

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American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

For more unhinged narrators with disturbing stories to tell, try these…

Tampa by Alissa Nutting for the bold, unflinching portrait of a young female teacher bent on seducing a 14-year old boy.

The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei for a dark satire that does for the modern marketing agency what American Psycho did for ‘80s Wall Street.

The Death of Bunny Monro by Nick Cave for the twisted, hilarious, sex-fueled adventures of a door-to-door salesman in the South of England.

The Room by Hubert Selby Jr. for a journey into the mind of a killer, and the sick fantasies of heroism and murder he imagines.

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Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

For more unique dystopian visions of the future, try these…

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess for a violent future Britain where the establishment seeks order by reforming dangerous youth.

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow for a 1984-inspired YA thriller set in the near future that explores the dystopian effect of post 9/11 policy.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel for a literary love letter to humanity after a flu pandemic wipes out 99% of the population.

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell for a genre-busting epic that starts in 1984 and ends in 2043.

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