fantasy

Showing 6 posts tagged fantasy

The Witches by Roald Dahl

For more supernatural tales for young adults try these…

Half Bad by Sally Green for a gritty supernatural fantasy following warring factions of witches in London,

The Woven Path by Robin Jarvis for a riveting series steeped in Norse mythology that revolves around the Wyrd Museum.

Banished by Liz de Jager for a modern fairytale about a kick-ass heroine whose family are all demon hunters.

Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett for a hilarious, tongue-in-cheek fantasy in which a tribe of witches help dethrone an evil king.

This post was guest edited by author Joshua Winning, whose latest book, Ruins, part 2 of The Sentinel Trilogy, is out in May.

Want to guest edit a Go Book Yourself post? To say thanks for reaching 150,000 followers on Tumblr, we’d love to feature your recommendations. To enter, just tell us which book would you give recommendations for, and why?

The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis

For more fantasy to make you believe magic is just through the nearest wardrobe, try these…

The Deptford Mice Trilogy by Robin Jarvis for more in utterly believable talking animals and a dark, dark fantasy world.

The Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner for beautiful, hard-edged fantasy using British mythology.

The Immortals series by Tamora Pierce for characters you desperately want to be and a world packed with fantastical races and monsters.

The Redwall series by Brian Jacques for a truly epic fantasy series of good versus evil.

This post was guest edited by author Laure Eve. Her latest novel, The Illusionists, is out now. You can find her on Twitter here.

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Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

For more subversive, literary fantasy, try these next…

Peter & Max by Bill Willingham for fairy tale deconstruction and shadowy charm

The Brides of Rollrock Island by Margo Lanagan for painfully gorgeous language and magic that crawls right up your spine

Magic Casement by Dave Duncan for a sneakily wonderful main character

Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman for head-spinning writing and thinking, and inside-out archetypes

This post was guest edited by Rainbow Rowell, author of Eleanor & Park, Fangirl, and Attachments. You can find her on Twitter.

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The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon 

For more entrancing characters and grown up fantasy, try these…

The Golem and the Djinni by Helene Wecker for a dramatic, magical story

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman for a playful, philosophical tale

Villette by Charlotte Brontë for Shannon’s inspiration for her main character

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess for a classic dystopia that inspired the language of The Bone Season

(for dashamolly)

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The Stand by Stephen King

If you liked The Stand‘s post-apocalyptic battle for humanity, try these…

The Passage by Justin Cronin for a world overrun with vampire-zombies

The Road by Cormac McCarthy for unpunctuated survival horror

Things We Didn’t See Coming by Stephen Amsterdam for the episodic journey of an apocalyptic everyman

Obernewtyn by Isobelle Carmody for fantasy with post-apocalyptic misfits

This post was guest edited by writer Craig Hildebrand-Burke, who blogs about books and writing for Momentum