kazuo ishiguro

Showing 9 posts tagged kazuo ishiguro

Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld

For more grown-up takes on boarding school fiction, try these…

St. Clare’s by Enid Blyton for a book series that will make you want to run away and join the O’ Sullivan twins at boarding school

Skippy Dies by Paul Murray for a hilarious, rambunctious story about the death of a young student at a Catholic boarding school in Dublin

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro for a beautifully rendered book that will make you think about life, mortality, and what it means to be human

The Secret History by Donna Tartt for a classic, devastatingly powerful campus novel that will stay with you for a very long time

This post was guest edited by author Louise O'Neill. Her debut novel Only Ever Yours is out now in the UK & Ireland (US April 2015). Follow her on Twitter.

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Go Book Yourself: Anna’s All-Time Top 5 Books

We hit 100,000 followers on Tumblr! To celebrate, each of us are posting our five favourite books. Here are Anna’s picks:

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, the book that changed my life. You can see the film I made about it for the Baileys Prize here.

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton for a book that entranced and delighted me. It both celebrates and challenges what a novel can do.

His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman for a trilogy that inspired, challenged and moved me as a child and adult.

The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro for my favourite book from my favourite author. Bizarre and lyrical, it’s utterly unique. 

Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger for two stories that provoked me to think about what I wanted out of life and my favourite of Salinger’s works.

Anna is the Recommendations Editor at Go Book Yourself. She also writes about books for The Bookseller and Elle UK. Find her on Twitter here.

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Downton Abbey – Yes, one is aware this is not a book

If Downton has left one wanting for riveting British class drama, try these…

The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishguro for an aged butler reflecting on a life of service to a “great gentleman”

Atonement by Iain McEwan for young love torn apart by class, war, and misunderstanding

Longbourn by Jo Baker for below stairs drama in a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from the servants’ perspective

The Suspicions of Mr Witcher by Kate Summerscale for a whodunnit at a wealthy estate, based on real events

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

For more horrific pursuits of human endeavour, try these…

Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep by Philip K Dick for another pursuit of artificial creations that reveals the humanity of the hunter

Atomised by Michel Houellebecq for a grim depiction of future reproduction by lonely scientists

Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco for the terror that comes when people create truth out of lies

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro for a view of life from the monster’s perspective

This post was guest edited by writer Craig Hildebrand-Burke. When he’s not talking about Stephen King, you can find him blogging for Momentum.

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The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

For for more surreal stories of fate and identity, try these…

The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann for an ordinary man and the ideas and people that alter his life

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki for fate and two normal women whose lives become entwined 

The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro for the dreamlike and surreal journey

The Glass Bead Game by Hermann Hesse for one man’s lifelong quest around human nature and identity 

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