reading

Showing 138 posts tagged reading

In The Woods by Tana French

For more psychological thrills that’ll leave you wondering about the reliability of your own memory, try these:

Visitation Street by Ivy Pochoda for a ghost story about teenage girls, grief, and forgetting.

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes for a scary-as-hell tale about how the internet never forgets.

Blue Monday by Nicci French for a psychologist navigating the no-man’s-land between dreams, memory,and reality.

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes for a Booker Prize-winning take on how we narrate our own history, truthfully or otherwise.

This post was guest edited by Emily Hughes, founder of proofreadingbooks, a blog of book and booze pairings. You can find her on Twitter.

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Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

For more unique takes on WWII, try these…

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut for another classic satirical exploration of the madness of war.

The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman for a madcap globetrotting WWII adventure that was long listed for the Man Booker Prize.

HHhH by Laurent Binet for a fictional retelling of the assassination of high ranking Nazi officer Reinhard Heydrich, an architect of the Holocaust.

Look Who’s Back by Timur Vermes for a novel that has Hitler waking up alive in 2011, and gaining a cult following as a Hitler-impersonator.

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Something Borrowed by Emily Giffin

For more tales about life, love, and New York, try these…

Everyone Worth Knowing by Lauren Weisberger for hauntingly accurate depiction of letting your job over-run your life in New York City.

Beastly by Alex Flinn for the tale of a young man punished for his vanity. A retelling of Beauty and the Beast set in contemporary New York. 

The Heiresses by Sara Shepard for frightening look at the lives of young, socialite woman in New York, and the people trying to destroy them. 

Bright Lights, Big City by Jay Mcinerney for an intense story of losing who you are to the party scene and the enthralling draw of Manhattan itself.

The post was guest edited by author Jill Knapp. Her latest novel, We’ve Always Got New York, is out Nov 20. You can find her on Twitter here.

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Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

For more moving and intelligent stories about modern life.

One Moment, One Morning by Sarah Rayner for an emotional story about friendship, family and loss.

After You’d Gone by Maggie O'Farrell for a beautifully written, tightly plotted tearjerker.

The Peculiar Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender for a quirky and insightful story about how to love the people we know the best.

One Day by David Nicholls for an iconic novel about missed opportunities and living life to the fullest. 

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Go Book Yourself 1st Birthday Special!

It’s our birthday! In just 12 months, we’ve recommended 653 books over 135 posts, and grown to over 130,000 followers. Thank you all so much!

To celebrate, here are our favourite books recommended to us by others…

Northern Lights by Philip Pullman was recommended to me by my Grandad, who bought it for me one Christmas. My grandad would buy me and my sister books every Christmas and this year he gave me what turned out to be one of my all time favourite books. 

The Sisters Brothers by Patrick DeWitt was recommended to me by Dan, who said the characters reminded him of us. I loved it. It was like stepping into the Wild West and sitting in a movie theatre at the same time. Great characters, brotherly bonds and a bad-ass search for gold!

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill was recommended to me by Anna. Anna is the best recommender of books I’ve ever met and for good reason, she knew I’d love this and she was right. It’s my favourite book of the year so far; hilarious, heartbreaking and beautifully written. Thanks Anna!

Tell us: What’s the best book you’ve ever been recommended, and who recommended it to you?