reading

Showing 138 posts tagged reading

The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis

For more fantasy to make you believe magic is just through the nearest wardrobe, try these…

The Deptford Mice Trilogy by Robin Jarvis for more in utterly believable talking animals and a dark, dark fantasy world.

The Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner for beautiful, hard-edged fantasy using British mythology.

The Immortals series by Tamora Pierce for characters you desperately want to be and a world packed with fantastical races and monsters.

The Redwall series by Brian Jacques for a truly epic fantasy series of good versus evil.

This post was guest edited by author Laure Eve. Her latest novel, The Illusionists, is out now. You can find her on Twitter here.

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The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

For more moving war novels like this year’s Man Booker prize winner…

A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute for a classic story that also uses the brutality of war alongside a moving love story in an Asian and Australian setting.

The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng for a previous Booker shortlisted novel which is a haunting and affecting look at the Japanese occupation of Malaysia. 

Regeneration by Pat Barker for another war story inspired by the author’s ancestors.

Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks for an epic novel of love and war telling the life story of one man.

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The Shadow of the Wind by Carols Ruiz Zafón

For more beautiful storytelling full of twists and turns, try these…

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton for a literary murder mystery packed full of complex character, motives and secrets.

The Bookman’s Tale by Charlie Lovett for a mystery involving an antique bookshop and mysterious paintings.

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield for intertwined stories of hidden family secrets about bookshops and novelists. 

People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks for a reverse chronological story about a book conservator exploring the history of a Jewish illuminated text.

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A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter

For more feverish love stories with unusual narration, try these… 

The Lover by Marguerite Duras for a lyrical and intensely erotic coming of age story that tangles identity and desire.

Bad Behavior by Mary Gaitskill for gritty stories about city life and the various, often less than entirely savory shapes that intimacy takes.

The Folding Star by Alan Hollinghurst for a blisteringly vivid portrait of a tutor’s obsession with his young charge.

Frances and Bernard by Carlene Bauer for a romance born and sustained through exceedingly lovely letters between two writers.

This post was guest edited by Caroline Eisenmann. Caroline works at a literary agency in New York. You can find her on Twitter here.

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Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

For more inventive and exciting adventure stories, try these…

Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne for another epic journey.

Northern Lights by Philip Pullman for an alternate world of adventure and wonder.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl for the excitement of exploring a new world.

Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell for a city explored from a different perspective.

The post was guest edited by author Kenneth Oppel. His latest novel, The Boundless, is out now. Follow him on Twitter here.

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