recommeded

Showing 5 posts tagged recommeded

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

For whip-smart YA with plenty of heart, try these next…

In Bloom by Matthew Crow for characters a little bit off the beaten track

Trouble by Non Pratt for a superb, moving yet witty look at what happens when life doesn’t go to plan

Me, Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews for a fresh, clever, and funny story of friendship

Artistotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz for a coming of age story about finding who you really are

(for chapelier–fou)

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The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon 

For more entrancing characters and grown up fantasy, try these…

The Golem and the Djinni by Helene Wecker for a dramatic, magical story

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman for a playful, philosophical tale

Villette by Charlotte Brontë for Shannon’s inspiration for her main character

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess for a classic dystopia that inspired the language of The Bone Season

(for dashamolly)

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Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen

For more stories of troubled teenagers and big questions, try these…

The Moth Diaries by Rachel Klein for a disconcerting story where it’s never clear what is real and what is in our protagonist’s mind

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides for a claustrophobic tale of urban discontent

Where The Moon Isn’t by Nathan Filer for a moving, prize-winning story of schizophrenia and mental institutions (AKA The Shock Of The Fall)

Loud in the House of Myself by Stacy Pershall for a memoir of a girl suffering with borderline personality disorder

(for breezin-before-n-after)

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

For more horrific pursuits of human endeavour, try these…

Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep by Philip K Dick for another pursuit of artificial creations that reveals the humanity of the hunter

Atomised by Michel Houellebecq for a grim depiction of future reproduction by lonely scientists

Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco for the terror that comes when people create truth out of lies

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro for a view of life from the monster’s perspective

This post was guest edited by writer Craig Hildebrand-Burke. When he’s not talking about Stephen King, you can find him blogging for Momentum.

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The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

For for more surreal stories of fate and identity, try these…

The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann for an ordinary man and the ideas and people that alter his life

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki for fate and two normal women whose lives become entwined 

The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro for the dreamlike and surreal journey

The Glass Bead Game by Hermann Hesse for one man’s lifelong quest around human nature and identity 

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